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Questions 51 plus


 

.Question 51

From :     Jenny, California

Posted :  
03 Dec 1998

Question :   Does anyone know where to find affordable Cadfael books? Please email me if you do. Thanks....

Favourite Story :   
The Pilgrim Of Hate

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 03 Jan 1999

Answer : A good place to search for books, especially in the USA is to go to www.amazon.com and enter 'cadfael' into the search box. Happy hunting...

also

From : sandy , California

Posted : 16 Jul 1999

Answer : Used book stores frequently get one or two of them in at a time. Try college or university towns. I bought some in San Luis Obispo and Santa Cruz. It works - I have the whole set.

Favourite Story :   An Excellent Mystery


.Question 52

From :     Pete LaRose, Cleveland

Posted :  
15 Dec 1998

Question :   Can you explian the ending of the Monk's Hood?

Favourite Story :   
The Heretic's Apprentice

Answer

From : Martin Renton, Bedlington, Nothumberland, England

Posted : 04 Jan 1999

Answer : Do you mean the ending to the mstery or the final page, where he is deciding whether to see Rachildis or not?
If you mean the last page, I found that confusing too, but can only assume he had to decide whether to tell her how he felt before she left or leave it in the past. On reading it a second time it seems as though there is part of the story missing!!

Favourite Story :   The Confession Of Brother Haluin

also

From : Jo Garner, Brisbane, Australia

Posted : 11 Apr 1999

Answer : I didn't have any problem with the ending although I couldn't categorically say whether he sees her or not.  I take the ending as intentionally vague to enhance Cadfael's character.  I think it is his way of saying he's content with how his life has turned out.

Favourite Story :   Brother Cadfael's Penance


.Question 53

From :     Mark Hartsuyker, Ithaca, NY, USA

Posted :  
18 Dec 1998

Question :   I am trying to obtain the score to the Brother Cadfael soundtrack which according to the CD I have is copyrighted owned by Soundtrack Music Records under license to EMI Records, Ltd.  Do you have any leads to finding this music in written form?  I am especially interested in track #16 "High Above the heavens"

Favourite Story :   
One Corpse Too Many


.Question 54

From :     Tina B, Massachusetts, USA

Posted :  
28 Dec 1998

Question :   Is Saint Peter's Fair (fesival, not book) fact or Fiction? Also who is based on historical figures in the book Saint Peter's Fair?
- Abbott Radulfus
- Master Corviser
- Hugh Beringar
- Thomas of Bristol
- Euan of Shotwick
- Rhodri ap Huw
- Ivo Corbiere

Favourite Story :   
St Peter's Fair

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 03 Jan 1999

Answer : I'm unsure of the actual fair, but here's a list of the characters that you mentioned. (Information from the Cadfael Companion by Robin Whiteman.

- Abbott Radulfus - fact ~ see also question 39
- Master Corviser - fiction
- Hugh Beringar - fiction
- Thomas of Bristol - fiction
- Euan of Shotwick - fiction
- Rhodri ap Huw - fiction
- Ivo Corbiere - fiction

also

From : Biggles286 from Sheffield, England.

Posted : 19 Sep 1999

Answer : Tina, I'm not sure whether there ever was a Saint Peters Fair but I think that it is very likely as Ellis Peters didn't tend to make up large events. I can help you more with the characters though.

- Abbot Radulfus definately existed. He became the Abbot at Shrewsbury some time after 1137 and died there in c. 1148.
- Master Corviser is a fictional character.
- Hugh Beringar is also a fictional character although there was a manor at Maesbury (Maesbury Hall stands in around the same place now) and it was mentioned in the Domesday Book.
- Thomas of Bristol is a fictional character but no doubt based on the hundreds of merchants that were about at the time.
- Euan of Shotwick is also a fictional character.
- Again Rhodri ap Huw is a fictional character as is Ivo Corbiere.
I hope this helps


.Question 55

From :     Sitaara, New South Wales, Australia

Posted :  
29 Dec 1998

Question :   Can I get Cadfael videos in Australia? If so, where from?

Favourite Story :  
One Corpse Too Many


.Question 56

From :     SPeale, VW (email withheld)

Posted :  
29 Dec 1998

Question :   Is there a website which would have the complete text of the stories. If so, what is it?

Favourite Story :   
Monk's Hood

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 03 Jan 1999

Answer : Hmmm..... not only would such a site require an awful lot of typing... it would go against the copyright of Elis Peters. So to answer your question...No.


.Question 57

From :     Jose Escobar, Charleston, SC

Posted :  
02 Jan 1999

Question :  In "The Leper of St. Giles, Prior Robert sprinkles Huon de Domville's corpse with a herb which I believe is a Santolina species, probably Santolina viridis or rosmarinifolius.  I would like to know whether anyone knows whether this herb was traditionally use for this purpose.  Although it is a Mediterranean herb, it can survive harsh winters and it was probably introudced to England by the Romans.  Some records state it was as late as the 16th century, but I believe it was much earlier.  The Greeks called it "abrotanon" and the Romans "abrotanum." In Spanish it is "abrotano."  I would appreciate any help or confimartion concerning the possible identification of this plant. 

Favourite Story :  
A Morbid Taste For Bones

Answer

From : Marcia

Posted : 02 Nov 1999

Answer : The fully documented scientific name for abrotanum is ARTEMISIA ABROTANUM. Common names are Southernwood, Lad's Love, Oldman Wormwood, European Sage, to name a few. AA is the dried aerial parts of Artemisia abrotanum L. (Fam. Compositae), a perennial, shrubby bush growing up to 1m in height. Lemon-scented, it was used in teas or to flavor patries and puddings, and also yielded a deep yellow dye. AA was used medicinally as an antiseptic, astringent, stimulent, tonic, and stomachic. It was also used to treat coughs, tumors and cancers. Because it contained volatile oils, it was also used as an insect and moth repellent.


.Question 58

From :     Beth Stowers, Ohio

Posted :  
07 Jan 1999

Question :  Does anyone know where I can get Cadfael scripts?

Favourite Story :  
Monk's Hood

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 10 Nov 1999

Answer : Although not an original script, the translation of Virgin in the Ice is now available on the Adventures of Cadfael page


.Question 59

From :     Ivan, USA

Posted :  
29 Mar 1999

Question :  Can someone help me to identify the opening chant song/piece that appears before the Cadfael episodes start. Have anyone seen this opening theme in mp3 format?

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 23 May 1999

Answer : According to the Cadfael CD, published by EMI, the opening title music is called Cadfael of Shrewsbury but I've not seen it on MP3.


.Question 60

From :     Jenn, London/Florida

Posted :  
26 Apr 1999

Question :  Is it true that Benedict Snadiford appeared in any of these tales??  Does anyone know of any other work he has done??

Favourite Story :  
The Rose Rent

Answer

From :    Seamyst

Posted : 26 Mar 2000

Answer : Yes, Benedict Sandiford appeared in "The Holy Thief", playing the visiting Brother Tutilo. I don't know if he's been in any other films.

Favourite Story :    Monk's Hood


.Question 61

From :     Carla Golden, Tacoma, Washignton, in the good old US of A

Posted :  
05 May 1999

Question :  I'm a relatively new fan of the good Brother, as I fell under his spell while watching ''The Pilgrim Of Hate''last January, and I've always wanted to know what Cadfael's name means? I mean, I appreciate learning the fact that it comes from the Welsh tongue, but it's so beautiful, I'd like to know its meaning! Please help, if at all possible.

Favourite Story :  
The Virgin In The Ice

Answer

From :    Seamyst

Posted : 26 Mar 2000

Answer : I don't know if Cadfael translates to anything in particular. However, in the intro of "A Rare Benedictine", Ellis Peters wrote "His name was chosen as being so rare that I can find it only once in Welsh history, and even in that instance it disappears almost as soon as it is bestowed in baptism. Saint Cadog, contemporary and rival of Saint David, a powerful saint in Glamorgan, was actually christened Cadfael, but ever after seems to have been familiarly known, as Sir John Lloyd says, as Cadog. A name of which the saint had no further need, and which appears, as far as I know, nowhere else, seemed just the thing for my man." Hope this helps!

Favourite Story :    Monk's Hood

Also

From :    Ellen

Posted : 13 Apr 2001

Answer : I was thinking about Question 61, the meaning of the name "Cadfael". Names are a hobby of mine, and I can indeed confirm that this name is as rare as the Benedictine himself. I decided to see what would happen using a translation site that I have found quite useful in the past: http://www.intertran.net:2000/InterTran
What came out was fascinating! I first typed "cadfael", and keyed in Welsh to English translation. The translator balked. I then broke it up into "cadd fael", which looked about right to me from the standpoint of "the way names work". This time there was a translation: "imperilled". I found this particularly intriguing: while he is in the habit of putting himself taking risks in order to help others, he has never struck me as being imperilled in the theological sense. He seems to have a very healthy relationship with both God and St Winifred. (As he says in "Brother Cadfael's Penance", you do what you must and then you pay for it, words that embody my own philosophy very well.)

Favourite Story :    I love all the stories, but am especially fond of those with any appearance by or mention of Olivier


.Question 62

From :    Mason, Russell, Manitoba, Canada

Posted :  
11 May 1999

Question :  Does anyone have any information about any Durkin Hayes Audio productions of the Brother Cadfael stories?  They are read excellently with great Welsh accents by British actor Glyn Huston.  Some years ago I got hold of the three stories in A Rare Benedictine and have just recently stumbled on A Morbid Taste for Bones.  Is anyone aware of any more? 
What opinions if any does anyone have on Huston's Cadfael as opposed to Jacobi's?

Favourite Story :  
The Sanctuary Sparrow

Answer

From : Corey J. Ruff from Springfield, PA.

Posted : 15 Oct 1999

Answer : I saw your post on the Cadfael Chronicles Message Board. By now you may already know this but aside from Durken Hayes there are several others doing recorded books of the cadfael series. Dove has many titles read by Derik Jacobi. Chivers Audio and Recorded Books, Inc. both have unabridged volumes of most the books, which is currently my most recent obsession. You can find info on buying or renting at www.recordedbooksinc.com . The readers are Patrich Tull (Recorded Books) and Stephen Thorne (Chivers). Both do a fine job. I've been digging around the net looking for the best deals I can get on these things, as the unabridgement can run up to $70 US. If you are interested in any deals, plese feel free to contact me.


.Question 63

From :    Akiko, Japan

Posted :  
15 May 1999

Question :  Does anybody know where I can buy Cadfael goods?
I am a Cadfael enthusiast from Japan.
I would like to know if there are any Cadfael goods such as mugcups other than books and videos.
If someone knows, please let me know how and where I can buy them.

Favourite Story :  
Monk's Hood


Question 64

From :    A W Lear, Edinburgh (Scotland, natch.)

Posted :  
16 May 1999

Question :  Maria Miles  -  the lovely if unloved Margery in "The Sanctuary Sparrow"  -  whatever has become of her?  Her last TV work that I know of was "The Cinder Path", several aeons ago.  Any information gratefully received, including (if she's married, in which case I hate him) the name she currently goes under.

Favourite Story :  
The Sanctuary Sparrow


Question 65

From :  Eric A, Ajax, Ontario

Posted :  19 May 1999

Question :   The Abbey in on the south side of the road in the 12th century maps (see here) but is on the north side today. Was the Abbey rebuilt in a different location or was the road re-routed?

Favourite Story :  The Summer Of The Danes

Answer

From : Biggles286 from Sheffield, England.

Posted : 19 Sep 1999

Answer : There were lots of changes to the abbey buildings over the years. In 1540 most of the monastic buildings were destroyed. In 1836 as you suggested, a new road was built. This is probably the reason for the differences on the maps.


Question 66

From :  Martina, Germany

Posted :  21 June 1999

Question :   Are the Cadfael stories also to be seen in Germany. Where could I get the Videos in German or English?

Favourite Story :  One Corpse Too Many

Answer

From : Jasmin

Posted : 12 October 1999

Answer : Some of the Cadfaels stories were shown at the ZDF last year. There is a chance that they will be shown again around Christmas.
There are no Cadfael stories on video in German. Sorry.


Question 67

From :  Jennet, Leicestershire UK

Posted :  7 June 1999

Question :   Any info on herbs, herb gardens, planting schemes etc. in Cadfaels time?

also

From :  Emily Cumming, Brighton, UK

Posted :  25 June 1999

Question :   I've heard that there's a new book out called Brother Cadfael's Herb Garden which contain extracts from books across the series.
Do you know anything about this?
Would be very glad of any information!

Favourite Story :  The Virgin In The Ice

Answer

From : Athena Pogue

Posted : 22 July 1999

Answer : Yes, Brother Cadfael's Herb Garden is published in hardcover in the US (not sure if it's available in UK bookstores). I got my copy from www.amazon.com , (or www.amazon.co.uk)and think it's very well done: excellently researched, and the photos and layout of the book are quite beautiful. There's a discussion of every herb mentioned throughout the series with references to herbalists from ancient to modern times. It's definitely worth going to amazon and checking out, if you can't find it locally.


Question 69

From :  Kelly, California

Posted :  03 August 1999

Question :   In Peters's "An Excellent Mystery", the second chapter, it talks about Brother Humilis being a Marescot. What is a Marescot and what is it's significance to the story?

Favourite Story :  Not seen / read any BUT want to !

Answer

From : Biggles286 from Sheffield, England.

Posted : 19 Sep 1999

Answer : Marescot was Humilis's family name. roughly translated, it means "of the marsh". The family was more than half saxon but when the Normans invaded they decided to change the name to Marescot from of the Marsh. The significance is simply that they were a great family and everybody had heard of the name.


Written by SteveC