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Question 1

From :     ME  :-)

Posted :   23 Jan 1998

Question :    Does anybody know when the next TV series of Cadfael will be shown in the UK. This will be series 4. I'd also be interested in just which stories are to be shown.

Answer

From : ME, in the UK

Posted : 31 Jan 1998

Answer :    The new films are The Holy Thief, The Potter's Field, and The Pilgrim Of Hate. The three new films will be seen on ITV in 1998. Stephen Smallwood, who has produced all 10 CADFAEL films to date, returns to produce his new series.  click here for more info on this.


Question 2

From :   Dale P. Niemeyer, Montana

Posted :   23 Jan 1998

Question :     I'm writing this in regards to the Cadfael television series which has recently been airing in my area through the Montana Public Television service. I thoroughly enjoy these stories and was wondering if they are available on video cassette to your knowledge.

Answer

From : Mike Merges , Rensselaer, NY

Posted : 27 Jan 1998

Answer :    If you watch the end of a PBS Cadfael story, after the credits they give a phone number to purchase copies of the program. Also, you might be able to get some information from the PBS Website, PBS.org. Just do a search for Mystery, and Cadfael will be in there. If you strike out on both of these, e-mail me. I recorded a few off-air, and can look for you. Good luck.

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones

also

From : lefidler, Chapel Hill NC USA

Posted : 06 Feb 1998

Answer :    Cadfael tapes and books and books about Cadfael are available online from Amazon.com and tapes are available from VideoServe.com. I've ordered other things from Amazon.com, and their service has been great. Books (and sometimes tapes) are discounted. They will also try to find out-of-print works. I've never used VideoServe, but they advertise 10 percent discounts on tapes.

Favourite Story :    They're ALL good !

also

From : Katie Welsh, Connecticut, USA

Posted : 08 Jun1998

Answer :    I have also seen large displays of the videos at the Borders Book/Music chain, if you have one of their stores near you.

Favourite Story :   
The Summer Of The Danes


Question 3

From :    Jose Escobar, Charleston, South Carolina

Posted : 23 Jan 1998

Question : Do you happen to know if Edith Pargeter's biography is out or in print?

Answer

From : Jen , Minnesota

Posted : 31 Jan 1998

Answer :    If you've read Edith Pargeter's "Shropshire", you'll know that in the introduction that she will never have an autobiography done or will she write a biography.

Favourite Story :    They're ALL good !

also

From : Jose Escobar , South Carolina

Posted : 3 Feb 1998

Answer :    There is a book by Margaret Lewis entitled 'Edith Pargeter:  Ellis Peters' which is listed as biography by www.Amazon.com.  It is a biography/study of Pargeter's life and works. I would say 1/3 is about her life, a short chapter of the Felse Novels, and the rest on Brother Cadfael. The paperback edition was published in 1994 and reprinted in 95,96,97. It was published by seren under the Border Lines series by Poetry Wales Press Ltd, Wyndham Street, Bridgend, Wales. The author is Margaret Lewis. The isbn # 1-85411-129-9. $15.95 US. It can be purchased through www.Amazon.com or call the U.S. distributor Dufour Editions, Chester Springs, PA, 19425-0007, tel- (610) 458-5005.

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones


Question 4

From :   Julie Fleming

Posted :   23 Jan 1998

Question : I cannot locate any historical reference to an Empress Maude. According to my sources, it was a Matilda who contested the throne of King Stephen. Is Maude really Matilda? If so, do you know what made Ellis Peters change her name. Her books are so well-founded in a historical framework that it seems odd to change a name like that. Any info. would be appreciated.

Answer

From : Linda J Sipe , Virginia Beach, VA USA

Posted : 29 Jan 1998

Answer :    Henry had 'one legal daughter,' named Matilda. She was also known as Maud. I don't know for sure, but I suspect she was also called Maud because she was married in childhood to the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V of Germany and was known in Germany as the Empress Maud.

Favourite Story :    The Rose Rent

also

From :    Karen , College Park, Maryland   USA

Posted : 06 Feb 1998

Question : Actually an addendum.  Stephen's wife was also Mathilda.  In writing about these times, many authors use Empress Maude (since she was known as Mathilda and Maude) to distinguish from Stephen's wife

Favourite Story :    The Potter's Field

also

From :    Pogo, near Houston TX USA

Posted : 16 Jun 1998

Question : Any What-to-Name-the-Baby will tell you that Maud is a version of Matilda.  Both are listed as Teutonic, although some popular histories say Matilda is Norman and Maud Saxon.

Favourite Story :    They're ALL good !


Question 5

From :    Elena, South Carolina

Posted : 31 Jan 1998

Question : Why did they recast Hugh Beringer in the PBS series? I liked the old one!

Favourite Story :    The Virgin in the Ice

also

From :    Barbara Christopherson, Woodland, CA

Posted : 31 Jan 1998

Question : We recently watched "Raven" and was disappointed that Sean Pertwee is no longer playing Hugh Beringer. Did he just quit, or has something happened to him?

Favourite Story :    The Leper of St Giles

also

From :    Julie T, in the US!

Posted : 31 Jan 1998

Question : One aspect of the first series that I particularily enjoyed was the relationship between Hugh and Cadael.The two actors seemed to have a natural raport that came across on the screen. Can anyone tell me why Sean Pertwee didn't continue on with the series? Isn't Hugh a continuing character, like Dr. Watson?

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones

also

From :    Joanne, Saskatoon Canada

Posted : 01 Feb 1998

Question : Why do they keep changing the actor that plays Hugh Beringar? Sean Pertwee was superb in the first series. The third series lacked the camaradie between Cadfael and Hugh that I so enjoyed. Is there anywhere to send comments to the producers of the show?

Favourite Story :    The Sanctuary Sparrow

also

From :   Fatjack, Canada

Posted : 05 Feb 1998

Question : I never did notice an answer to the often asked question: Why isn't the original actor who played Hugh Beringar still doing so? He was far superior.

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones

also

From :   Camille, the Midwest, too

Posted : 19 Mar 1998

Question : Why hasn't anyone answered the Sean Pertwee/Hugh Beringer question?  The books show how Cadfael and he relate to each other and SP really played the part as Ellis Peters must have envisioned it.  How can we find out why he's not playing that part anymore?

Favourite Story :    The Rose Rent

also

From :   Jen, Minnesota

Posted : 02 Jan 1999

Question : How come the actor who plays Hugh Beringar keeps changing? They should've stayed with Sean Pertwee. He seemed to play the character very closely to how he was described in the books - and he's REALLY handsome to top it all off! :)

Favourite Story :    They're ALL good !

also

From :   beth stowers, perrysburg,OH

Posted : 06 Jan 1999

Question :: Hey! We all want to know why Sean Pertwee left acting as Hugh!He played Hugh the best of all three hugh's(Sean,Eoin,and Athony). If some one has the answer to this question PLEASE help me by telling me why!!

Favourite Story :    Monk's Hood

Answer

From : Mike Merges, Rensselaer, NY USA

Posted : 08 Jun 1998

Answer :    : I found a couple of web pages that have stories on Sean Pertwee.  He set up a production company in the UK and has done a couple of films, acting and directing.  Here are the addresses:

http://gonzo.sowi.uni-mainz.de/%7Emuench/SPecial/spdb/notes/nn.htm
http://gonzo.sowi.uni-mainz.de/%7Emuench/SPecial/bytes/indexbg.html#pertwee

I don't know if we will see him in the fourth set of Cadfael videos, but I certainly hope so!

Favourite Story :   
An Excellent Mystery

also

From :   Sarah, USA

Posted : 07 Oct 1998

Answer :   Sean Pertwee is not pertraying Hugh in the 4th season because he has had to spend his time working on the film 'Soldiers' with Kurt Russell.  If Cadfael goes into a 5th season and Sean doesn't have any projects, I hope he will return to the role of Hugh.  He's a great actor (and good looking to boot!).

Favourite Story :    The Sanctuary Sparrow

also

From :   Rebecca Rehkop, Missouri,USA

Posted : 07 May 1999

Answer :   Sean quit the set.  Not because of any bad feeling, but just because he wanted to move on.  (I think this was about the time he got the offer to play Smitty in Paul Anderson's "Event Horizon" (they are good buds). I agree, he was the best, and in my opinion the most accurate to the books, Hugh Beringar.

Favourite Story :    One Corpse Too Many


Question 6

From :    T. Van Voris, Atlanta

Posted : 31 Jan 1998

Question :

My husband and I are having an, um, "discussion" about the cast list from the 3 series, and since the UK Cadfael site is not currently up, I thought I'd check with another fan for the answer to this one:
Who is playing Hugh in the 3rd series?
My husband claims that it is Eoin McCarthy again - but I am not so sure...it's been awhile since we've seen the earlier episodes.

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 02 Feb 1998

Answer :    'Fraid husband is right this time! It is indeed Eoin McCarthy. Watch out for another Hugh in the fourth series though!


Question 7

From :    Carleen, Birmingham, Al

Posted : 02 Feb 1998

Question :

My question is about the first Hugh.  Is Sean Pertwee in any way related to the late Jon Pertwee of Dr.Who fame?  My husband seems to think there is a faint resemblance. 

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 02 Feb 1998

Answer :    Yes indeed, Sean Pertwee is the son of the late Jon (3rd Dr Who and Worzel Gummidge) Pertwee.


Question 8

From :    Mark Gladstone, Bethesda, MD

Posted : 05 Feb 1998

Question : Did Cadfael, being Welsh, speak Welsh as his native language?  Was this also true of the people of Shrewsbury?  But when he went off out, what language was generally his mode of communication?  And what language was he probably most comfortable with, besides Welsh? Finally, what--if any--language besides Latin did they probably speak in the abbey?

Favourite Story :    They're ALL good !

Answer

From : Jose Escobar , South Carolina

Posted : 14 Feb 1998

Answer :    He is proficient in Welsh as well as English according to the chronicles.  He also spoke Latin which he acquired later in life although he never felt comfortable with it.  It is safe to asume that he also read Latin as it seems he was familiar with the writings of some of the early Church Fathers.  Nothing is mentioned about reading Greek, a language which was probably found among the monastic texts and collections in most Benedictine abbeys.
As a young man, Cadfael lived in Antioch and fought in Palestine and the Eastern Mediterranean.  One of his love interests, Mariam, was from Antioch.  Is it safe to assume that he developed some proficiency in Arabic.?  He did study with Siryan physicians and herbalists, and most of his knowledge of herbs came from them and his own experience.  As far as I know, there is nothing in the chronicles about this.
He spent some time in Normady upon his return as he joined Roger Maduit's forces there.   Did he pick some French or "would be French" while in Normandy?   There is also mention of the Norman conquest in the chronicles and I wonder what linguistic contribution they may have brought with them.  I am not familiar with the Norman conquest and this period to answer any of this with certainty.
Within the monastery walls, Latin was the language of prayer and probably the "official" language.  Yet having  monks from different regions, I would not be surprised if other languages, even dialects, where used at times.  In Shrewsbury; it seems that both Welsh and English were used but better have someone from the UK answer this one.


Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones

also

From :   debora, olympia, washington, usa

Posted : 06 Jun 1998

Answer : In the early Middle Ages, French was the language of choice. Latin was the language of the Church, and all countries had their own "vulgar" dialects, but French was the language of the nobility and for speaking to large groups. Although Cadfael may have spoken English, (i'm not sure about which book would indicate that) certainly Hugh and his soldiers would have spoken French, as well as the Prior and the Abbot, being educated men. English was the language of the Saxons, who were conquered by the Normans, who spoke "langue d'oui" as opposed to the "Langue d'oc" of southern France. "Langue d'oui" is closest to modern-day French.

Favourite Story :    whichever one I am currently reading (presently "Monk's Hood)  :-)

also

From :  Pogo, Houston, Texas USA

Posted : 09 Jul 1998

Answer : Cadfael spoke fluent Welsh and English, according to several of the books.He certainly spoke Arabic, with all the time he spent fighting and working in the Near East.  I'm sure he also spoke 11th century Greek (Arianna the boat girl) and the debased Latin (early Italian) of Venice (Bianca).
The English of Cadfael's Shrewsbury would have been early Middle English. (Beowulf is in classical Old English, also called Anglo-Saxon; Chaucer is Middle English; Shakespeare is early Modern English.)  The Norman Conquest is three generations in the past; the children of the Norman lords would have grown up playing with the servants' and farmers' children.  But the Normans would have spoken French among themselves -- especially if they didn't want the servants to understand (pas devant les domestiques!).  When they were at homes in France, they probably used English for the same purpose.  But true Middle English didn't really develop until Maud's grandson, John Lackland, got his nickname by losing all the French possessions.  English and French in England then consolidated.  For purposes of poshness, French continued to be spoken in England, but it developed on its own -- Chaucer's Wife of Bath spoke French, but "Frenssh of Parys was to hir unknowe." By the way, Maud's father, Henry I, spoke English (*The Story of English,* PBS companion book), and Maud's mother was English.


Question 9

From :    A Humble Viewer who lives in the midwest, USA

Posted : 09 Feb 1998

Question : Does anyone know if Sir Derek Jacobi is married?

Favourite Story :    Brother Cadfael's Penance

Answer

From : Keen viewer from Downunder

Posted : 24 Feb 1998

Answer : Sir Derek Jacobi is only married to his work. He has never married, and most likely will never marry. He is a master of the classical stage.

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones


Question 10

From :    Brian, Waterford, Wis. USA

Posted : 09 Feb 1998

Question : Is the Music that is played on the TV series available on CD?

Favourite Story :    The Virgin In The Ice

Answer

From : Someone in the Midwest, USA

Posted : 02 Mar 1998

Answer : The Cadfael CD is available. It was out in 1996 and is copyrighted by Soundtrack Music Records under exclusive license to EMI Records Ltd. It includes Gregorian Chants performed by the Clerkes of St Albans Abbey.

Favourite Story :    One Corpse Too Many


Question 11

From :    Nancy Russell, Nashville, Tennessee USA

Posted : 09 Feb 1998

Question : I want to know when we will be able to see the new series.   We just had A Morbid Taste for Bones.  Will we be able to see the ones filmed in '98 in '98 or will it be '99.  I also want to state that I think they should return the part of Hugh Berrenger to the actor who was in the last series.  He was great. 

Favourite Story :    The Virgin In The Ice

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 09 Feb 1998

Answer :    Chances are you will see the new (4th series) in 1998. But no firm plans have been announced as far as I'm aware.


Question 12

From :    Lorraine Bell, Morgan Hill,California USA

Posted : 27 Feb 1998

Question : I love this series of books,and as I would like to own my own collection of the Chronicles I would like to find a hardback book series. So far I can't find any of Brother Cadfael's stories in anything but paperback. Does anyone have any leads on finding this series in hardback. Thanks, and love the site!

Favourite Story :    The Virgin In The Ice

Answer

From :    Pogo, near Houston TX USA

Posted : 22 Jun 1998

Answer : Support your local independent mystery bookstore!   To find the closest one, go to the Web phone book (in the U.S., www.switchboard.com).  As you scroll through the listing of Book Dealers-Retail, watch for keywords like Crime, Murder, Baker Street....  These bookstore owners know the field like no one else, and if they don't know the answer, they know where to find it.

Favourite Story :   
They're ALL good !

also

From :    Jan, Ohio, USA

Posted : 07 Jan 1999

Answer : Regarding locating hard-cover copies of Cadfael books...check the Barnes and Noble website at www.barnesandnoble.com
They offer access to locating out-of-print and signed copies through other bookseller sources. 
Be prepared however --MOST of the hard copies are very pricey running anywhere from $70 - $2000.

Favourite Story :    One Corpse Too Many

also

From :    Seamyst

Posted : 26 Mar 2000

Answer : If you're on very good standing at your local library (or especially if you work or volunteer there) you might ask about ordering through them. While my local library's provider doesn't carry all of the Cadfael books :(, I can also get a forty percent discount - which means that instead of paying $6, I'm only paying $3.20 or so per book - especially nice if you're on a limited budget! If this doesn't work for you, the librarian might have a suggestion of where to get them.

Favourite Story :    Monk's Hood


Question 13

From :    DC Lee, Michigan, USA

Posted : 02 Mar 1998

Question : Will PBS be running anymore Cadfael mysteries? We only saw about five
and my wife and I just loved watching them. Thanks.

Favourite Story :    The Virgin In The Ice

Answer

From : Marita, Baltimore MD

Posted : 25 Mar 1998

Answer : I can't specifically say when because it varies from region to region. I occasionally browse through www.pbs.org to download the month's program schedule of the PBS station in my region. Another place to check is WGBH Boston's Mystery! site. Sorry, I don't know it offhand but use a search engine; I used one to find Mystery! and Masterpiece Theatre sites. They'll probably rerun it sooner or later. They'd better; I only saw two of them. Hope I answered the question to some extent.

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones


Question 14

From :   Fredrik Erlandsson, Sweden

Posted : 03 Mar 1998

Question : Does anyone know if we will get to see the Cadfael TV-series in Sweden ?

Favourite Story :    St Peter's Fair


Question 15

From :   Randy Schum, Orlando, Florida

Posted : 19 Mar 1998

Question : The words to the music sung by the countertenor at the beginning and ending of the Cadfael videos are in Latin.  However, I cannot discern the Latin words. Can anyone provide me with the Latin text and English translation?   

Favourite Story :    They're ALL good !

From : Pat Green

Posted : 13 Jan 2002

Answer : I can't understand the chanting in the middle, but the singing seems to be:
Veni Sancte Spiritus, Mentes tuorum visita. Amen

According to the (somewhat florid) translation in my trusty Gregorian Hymnal, it means:
Come, Holy Spirit, vouchsafe to make our minds thy home(!)

I didn't take latin (in catholic school!), so I'm not sure what a more literal translation would be.
I've only found sources for six of the tracks altogether, and some of those are incomplete.


Question 16

From :   Marita, Baltimore MD -                     

Posted : 25 Mar 1998

Question : Along with the question that is asking about hardback books, where are these omnibus editions located? Are they only found in the U.K.? Whenever I go into Waldenbooks or B. Dalton's, I keep getting the same paperback chronicles and never the exact ones I want! Unfortunately, my forays into the Internet are few and far between...

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones

From :
Me

Posted : 25 Mar 1998

Answer : I bought my omnibus set from the WHSmith book shops chain over here in the UK. However, I've done a bit of searching and have found an online ordering page which lists the omnibus editions. It's at : www.thebookplace.com. I've used them when ordering a book only in print in the US to be sent to the UK, and I think the reverse is possible, you just choose the company nearest to you when asked. Search on 'CADFAEL OMNIBUS' from the search menu for a complete list. Good luck!


Question 17

From :   Two Sisters, California

Posted : 26 Mar 1998

Question : Is there a biography of Sir Derek Jacobi?

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones


Answer

From : Joanne, from Canada

Posted : 30 Mar 1998

Answer :    Derek Jacobi has his own homepage with lots of info on the the actor including a list of biographies.  Check it out on the links page

Favourite Story :    They're All Good!


Question 18

From :   Richard Bouchard, Long Beach, MS USA

Posted : 26 Mar 1998

Question : In the PBS series episode  A Morbid Taste for Bones as they are digging up St. Winifred there are some rituals going on in the background. To the left is some sort of whirligig contraption and to the right a man is waving something around. I did not notice any reference to these rituals in the book or in the episode. Anyone know what those objects and rituals were and their purpose?

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones


Question 19

From :  Richard Bouchard, Long Beach, MS USA

Posted : 26 Mar 1998

Question : In One Corpse Too Many (the edition published by William Morrow & Company, 1980, p. 68) Peters writes: " But you'll be well enough, no one is going to have leisure to look hard at you until that corn is in the barn." My question is on the use of the word corn. Was 12th century "corn"   applied to another grain or produce before it applied to the New World maize discovered  400 years later? Peters does not use the word before or thereafter in the book.

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones

Answer

From :Marita, Baltimore MD

Posted : 30 Mar 1998

Answer :    That corn question intrigued me because what you said is right. I happened to have that book and reread the passage. I looked up the word corn in a huge, heavy, unabridged dictionary. Apparently, the word corn can be used to describe the seed of cereal plants such as maize, barley and rye. The dictionary further said that in England the word corn refers to wheat. So, in that passage, Peters' usage of the word corn is referring to wheat rather than corn(maize).

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones

also

From : Andrew Aldridge from Essex, England (hello neighbour!)

Posted : 30 Mar 1998

Answer :    In England the word 'corn' relates to (and I quote from a dictionary here)...."grain, fruit of cereals; grain of all kinds; US maize;...". It's only in the U.S. that corn relates purely to maize.

Favourite Story :    A Morbid Taste For Bones


Question 20

From : Jen, MA USA

Posted : 30 Mar 1998

Question : Did anyone else find it annoying that Brother Mark was totally ignored in the television series?  He was far more interesting than Oswin in the novels. 

Favourite Story :    St Peter's Fair

Answer

From : Joanne, Canada

Posted :
09 Jun 1998

Answer :    Just wanted to say that I too found Brother Mark to be an intriguing character.  It would have been interesting to see him protrayed on the screen.  But I suppose, unlike the novels, the TV series was limited by what it could do in a few hours.  That is one reason I prefer the books.

Favourite Story :   
They're ALL good !

also

From : JuJu, Massachusetts

Posted :
02 Dec 1998

Answer :    Brother Mark did get a short appearence in the Leper of St. Giles episode. But nothing along the lines of a deep character portrayal though. Too bad!

Favourite Story :    The Virgin In The Ice

also

From : Nathan, Houston TX

Posted :
02 Jan 1999

Answer :    In the novel Summer of the Danes it is stated that Brother Mark became Deacon of Lichfield

Favourite Story :    The Leper Of Saint Giles

also

From :    Seamyst

Posted : 26 Mar 2000

Answer : Brother Mark is also in "The Devil's Novice", during the time he was at St. Giles. I felt he played a very important role in this book, and was upset when I saw that they replaced him with Brother Oswin. Mind, I don't have anything against Oswin. I think he's very sweet and naive. I just don't like how they used him as a sort of permanent assistant, except for Brother Adam. I do wish that Ellis Peters had brought "Father Mark" into one of the stories. That would have a nice conclusion, as Cadfael sometimes remarks that there are things that he'll only confess when Mark becomes ordained, but he never does.

Favourite Story :    Monk's Hood


Question 21

From : Paolo Cervino, Italy/Luxembourg

Posted : 13 Apr 1998

Question : Was Brother Cadfael's Penance the last book (in Cadfael's chronology) of the series or is there a sequel?

Favourite Story :    Brother Cadfael's Penance

Answer

From :Me

Posted :
30 Mar 1998

Answer :    The story 'Brother Cadfael's Penance' was not the last Cadfael story by Ellis Peters published. However the following (and last book Cadfael book ever published ) 'A Rare Benedictine' was a collection of three short 'prequel' stories, all set before the time of 'Brother Cadfael's Penance'. This means, unfortunately, that there is no sequel to 'Brother Cadfael's Penance'. Click here for a full run down of the Cadfael book stories.

Apologies for the above, as pointed out by Sue Feder, (founder, The Ellis Peters Appreciation Society; The Historical Mystery Appreciation Society) the collection A Rare Benedictine was published in 1988, some six years before Brother Cadfael's Penance.


Question 22

From : Morgan, Williamsville, IL

Posted : 17 Apr 1998

Question : I'm wondering how many times Cadfael's son, Olivier, appears in the Chronicles. I know he's in The Virgin in the Ice and Brother Cadfael's Penance. In Brother Cadfael's Penance it mentions that he's in another story between those two. Does anyone know which story that is?

Favourite Story :    The Virgin In The Ice

Answer

From :Me

Posted :
17 Apr 1998

Answer :    Olivier also appears in the story 'A Pilgrim of Hate'. He is also briefly mentioned in 'The Devil's Novice' and 'An Excellent Mystery''


Question 23

From : RM, from NY

Posted : 21 Apr 1998

Question : Can you give us any vital statistics about Sir Jacobi? Height, weight, personality profile, etc.
Also, will all the books in the Cadfael series be filmed?

Favourite Story :   They're ALL good !

Answer

From :Carol W. Merck, Atlanta, GA

Posted :
11 May 1999

Answer :   According to his casting information Sir Derek is 5 ft. 10 inches tall, weight 12 stone 11 pounds (179 - 180 US pounds). 
His personality profile would put him as slighty shy. Having met him personally I can say that he is a ver genuine person. The age band he is  normally cast in is 56-65.  His special skills are Ballroom Dancing*, Jive Dancing*, Tenor*, Swimming*, Tennis*.  Other Performance Skills :  TV Presenting, Voice Over.  His mother tongue is English* with accents :  Birmingham, Cockeny, London, Yorkshire, New York, Belfast and Southern Irish.

(*=Highly skilled)


Question 24

From : Angele Caporicci, Timmins Ontario, Canada

Posted : 11 May 1998

Question : I am a big fan of Ellis Peters and all her works. I have over 50 of her novels either written as Ellis Peters/Edith Pargeter. Unfortunately, I am unable to get some of her novels here in Canada. They seem not to be available. I also wish they would release some the television series movies in Canada. I saw one (it was on the
PBS Channel in USA in Detroit) of the series, and would love to see more!!! Do you have any internet spots in USA or Canada where I can order her books? Thanks a million,

Favourite Story :    They're ALL good !

Answer

From :Me

Posted :
11 May 1998

Answer :    Some of the larger Internet book services should stock most of the Ellis Peters/Edith Pargeter books. You could try www.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Books/Mystery/ which should give you a big enough list to get going with!!


Question 25

From : debora , olympia, washington, usa

Posted : 08 Jun 1998

Question : What color is Cadfael's habit?

In the book, Peters always describes his habit as black or rusty black. In the series, Jacobi's costume is brown. I have such faith in the BBC that I cannot imagine they would make such a mistake, but how does one reconcile the differences?

Favourite Story :    Whichever one I am currently reading.

Answer

From : Grace, Columbia, MD, USA

Posted :
09 Jun 1998

Answer :   Many monastic habits have a designated color to express their particular order. The Little Sisters of the Poor have a white habit, and the Carmelites have a brown habit. I am not absolutely certain if the Benedictine habit is black, the only Benedictines I know are a lay order of Benedictines so they don't wear a habit,
but I think it is black, and Ellis Peters' research seems to designate the Benedictine habit as black.


Favourite Story : The Heretic's Apprentice

also

From : Jo Garner, Brisbane Australia

Posted :
09 Jun 1998

Answer :   From reading I gather that his habit was black.  There are many references to the habits of the monks and they seemto always be described as black.  From reading other books that contain Benedictine Monks I believe their habits were black.

Favourite Story :The Leper Of Saint Giles

also

From : Pogo, near Houston TX USA

Posted : 18 Jun 1998

Answer :   Benedictine habits are/were black.   (Dominicans white, Franciscans brown.) Blackfriars Lane in London had a Benedictine monastery.  The question is: How black is black?  If there were enough black sheep to supply black wool for all the habits, fine.  Otherwise, white wool must be dyed.  Until about 100 years ago, dyes for fabric were vegetable-based (most of 'em).   Black dyes were either very dark green (much of the green in tartans used to be black) or very dark brown (as India ink is still today).  Cadfael's habit was probably deeply dyed with brown, which would fade to a "rusty" shade.
Cadfael's adventures begin about 75 years before the founding of the Dominican and Franciscan orders.  But there were Cistercians (at least two monasteries in England) who wore gray: perhaps plain unbleached wool (we'd call it cream or "fisherman" now), perhaps unbleached, running-water retted flax, or maybe white and black wool spun together.
Habits mostly got abandoned after Vatican II.  The last nun I knew who wore a habit was High Church Episcopal (Anglo-Catholic); her order had had to
change their habit because the right starch for their wimples wasn't being made because the Roman Catholic demand was gone. But the Benedictine nuns
I grew up with wore black habits (so did the one monk I met -- a retired Father Abbot) except that when one was sent to Brazil in about 1960, her tropical habit was white (but probably still wool).


Favourite Story :They're ALL good !


Question 26

From : debora, olympia, washington, usa

Posted : 08 Jun 1998

Question : in which book does hugh become sheriff?

Favourite Story :    Whichever one I am currently reading.

Answer

From :Me

Posted :
08 Jun 1998

Answer :    Following the death of Sheriff Gilbert Prestcote in March 1141 (Dead Man's Ransom), Hugh assumes the title of Sheriff. But it's not until December of that same year that he is given royal confirmation of the title at Canterbury (Raven in the Foregate).


Question 27

From : Richard Bouchard, Long Beach, MS USA

Posted : 08 Jun 1998

Question : In the short story The Price of Light (in the book A Rare Benedictine), Peters writes: "His cell was by the night stairs, and the prior slept at the end of the long room."
What are night stairs, as oppposed to just plain stairs?

Favourite Story :   Monk's Hood

Answer

From :Marita

Posted :
09 Jun 1998

Answer :    The night stairs refer to stairs which lead down into the abbey church. They are called night stairs because at night there is a candle which burns all night at the top of the stairs. When Matins, Lauds, and Prime occur, it is still dark (around midnight, 5am, & 7am)(check out the monk's services here) and the monks use these stairs since they lead directly to the choir altar. Cadfael's cell is near these stairs and conveniently, Prior Robert, who is a sound sleeper, has a cell in the far end of the dortoir away from the night stairs. Of course, Abbot Radulfus has his own lodge. When he sneaks out, Cadfael descends the night stairs, lit by the candle, walks through church and out using the west door of the abbey church which is never locked except during a siege. It leads him outside the abbey walls and onward to Shrewsbury bridge and town. I guess they use a different staircase to the dortoir during the day.

Favourite Story :   A Morbid Taste For Bones

also

From : Jo Garner, Brisbane Australia

Posted :
09 Jun 1998

Answer :    I have always assumed that the night stairs were ones used during the night that connected the dortoir to the church and were used for night services for the ease of the monks, but I'm just guessing!

Favourite Story :   The Leper Of Saint Giles


Question 28

From : Chesley Elam, Richmond, VA  U.S.A.

Posted : 11 Jun 1998

Question : Please, can anyone send me a list of the order of the Cadfael books according to their original publication dates?  I have read the Omnibus list, but I'm not sure if those Omnibuses are in turn arranged chronilogically.

Favourite Story :  The Leper Of Saint Giles

Answer

From :Me

Posted :
11 Jun 1998

Answer :    The dates given above each story on the omnibus pages show their 'first published' date. I've also included the first publication date of the omnibus books as well. From looking through, you can see that all the omnibus stories are indeed in their original publication date order (remember that the Cadfael stories run chronologically) with the exception of 'A Rare Benedictine' which was published either before or after 'The Confession of Brother Haluin'. Both of which were published in 1988. Does anyone else know which of these publications came first?

also

From :    Pogo, near Houston TX USA

Posted : 16 Jun 1998

Question : In the U.S., at least:
Brother Haluin -- pub Jan 89    Rare Benedictine --    Nov 89
Brother Haluin's copyright is 1988.  The stories of Rare Benedictine are copyright 1979, 1981, and 1985; of the intro, 1988. 

Where did they originally appear?
(Source:  front matter of the original hardcovers)

Favourite Story :    They're ALL good !


Question 29

From :Jo Garner, Brisbane   Australia

Posted : 15 Jun 1998

Question : I've noticed on the front cover of the first omnibus the drawing of the monk's arms is back to front.  The thumbs are on the wrong side of the hands.  Since it seems unlikely that an illustrator would make that kind of error, we thought it may be according to medieval style.  Is that possible?

Favourite Story :  The Leper Of Saint Giles

Answer

From :Me

Posted :
15 Jun 1998

Answer :    Your question sent me zooming back to my omnibus edition to have a closer look and, indeed, you are right about the hands. I certainly think that you are right in that the artist was trying to capture a 'medieval' style since they used to draw a lot in 2 dimentions, normally side-on. It also struck me that this style wasn't too popular in the Cadfael Omnibus series, since the illustrations soon turned back to a more 'normal' style (the very next book in fact!).

See also the next question...


Question 30

From :     ME

Posted :   15 Jun 1998

Question :    Does anybody out there have copies of the 'original' paperbacks. I'm thinking of the ones published before Derek Jacobi became the main cover art. If so, what type of illustrations were on them?

Answer

From : Jo Garner

Posted : 16 Jun 1998

Answer : Your question sent me scurrying for the old editions in the school library. (The librarian thanks you for your hello.  By the way, she has written to you before about the Cadfael addicts amongst the staff here at this school!)   The old covers do not actually have illustrations.  The covers have the story titles done in illuminated manuscript in the style of the Book Of Kells, complete with celtic borders. Just as I was leaving your pages I noticed the heading for your Cadfael Chronicles page.  The heading for that page is in the same style as the covers of the books.

Favourite Story :   
The Leper Of Saint Giles


Question 31

From :     Jacquelyn, Midwest USA

Posted :   18 Jun 1998

Question :   My question is this: Where can I find out any info on Eoin McCarthy?  I know there is an article in the Jan/Feb 1998 issue of "Theatre" magazine, but I haven't been able to get my hands on a copy.  I'm a Brit in the Midwest of USA and would like to know more and don't know where to start.
 I know I'm kinda in the minority here, but I love Eoin McCarthy, and think he does an admirable job, since Sean Pertwee did not return.

Also, is there a chat room devoted to Cadfael-holics?  

If anyone has the mentioned article, send me a transcript and I'll post it here!

also

From :    Lids, Slovenia

Posted : 01 Jul 1998

Question : Where can I find a picture of Eoin McCarthy (and some info, too)? I don't have an e-mail. So, could anybody just show me the way to the site with his pics and info? Please!!!!

Favourite Story :    They're ALL good !

Answer

From :   Jacquelyn, Midwest USA

Posted : 22 Jun 1998

Answer : Actually, I can answer part of my own question.   The publisher of "Theatre" magazine is going to forward me on a copy of the issue I'm looking for.  I am still interested in any further info out there, if any, on such a volatile topic.  Also, am still looking for a Cadfael-type chat room.

If possible, Jacqualyn, still send me a transcript.

also

From : Lids

Posted : 28 Aug 1998

Answer : Eoin is mentioned at the following address: http://dialspace.dial.pipex.com/town/avenue/aca01/Editor/tv.htm


Question 32

From :     Pogo, near Houston TX USA

Posted :  
18 Jun 1998

Question :   Why are the videos in such a weird order?   Even within a series, there's no sense to it.  Series One runs 5-3-7-2.
This eliminates suspense from One Corpse Too Many -- we've already seen that Beringar is a good guy.

Answer

From :

Posted :

Answer : 


Question 33

From :     Tom Thiel, Monterey, Calif

Posted :  
29 Jun 1998

Question :   Where exactly is Cadfael filmed? I love the sets. The town looks like a permanent set rather than a temporary construction.

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 29 Jun 1998

Answer : The seires is shot in Hungary. That I do know :)   However, can anyone give any further details as to location, or whether the set is permanent?

also

From : Anna Glover, Alexandria, VA

Posted : 06 Jul 1998

Answer : The PBS series in the U.S. is presented by Diana Riggs. While presenting the concluding remarks for one of the episodes (it's been so long, I don't remember which one it was) she talked about the village they recreated in Hungary. From everything she said, it sounded like the village is a permanent set.

Favourite Story :    The Virgin in the Ice


.Question 34

From :     Pogo, near Houston TX USA

Posted :  
08 Jul 1998

Question :   Where did the word "brychan" come from?   I cannot find it in the Oxford English Dictionary (the multi-volume one that has every word used in English
since 1150) or in Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary (Cambridge). It sure doesn't look French or, really, Welsh to me.  Is it Shrewsbury dialect?

Answer

From : Richard Bouchard, Long Beach, MS USA

Posted : 11 Aug 1998

Answer : Welsh, perhaps Welsh. I say perhaps because it is listed in an online Welsh-English dictionary. Unfortunately, no definition is listed, but it is tagged as a noun. Doublely unfortunate is that that page has not been updated since 1996.

Follow-up from Pogo :Now that Richard has let me know that brychan is Welsh, I've found it in Hippocrene Standard Welsh-English/English-Welsh dictionary, by H. Meurig Evans, who says it means "plaid."

Follow-up from Leigh Gerfin :"brychan" is a woven woolen bed-covering, a blanket.


.Question 35

From :     tracey, Australia

Posted :  
20 Jul 1998

Question :   I don't suppose you know when (or even if) the 4th series Cadfael is coming to Australia?  Got the others taped, can't wait to complete the series.

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 01 Aug 1998

Answer : (more of a comment really) I cartainly don't think it will be 'IF'. Indeed the second of the 4th series shown still has not been seen over here in the UK. It is taking a LONG time for it to filter through. I don't know what the ITV channel is playing at really!

also

From : Kirsty Young , from Melbourne, Australia

Posted : 03 Jan 2000

Answer : At the moment, the Pay-TV (FOXTEL) is showing the Cadfael TV series 4. I saw ""The Holy Thief" & "The Potter's Field" last week, & on 8th Jan 2000 they aare showing "St Peter's Fair". I only found this by accident, while visiting my parents for Christmas.
Who knows when it will be picked up by free-to-air TV. Hope you have luck with catching up with it.


.Question 36

From :     Linda Roy, North Bay, Ontario Canada

Posted :  
31 Jul 1998

Question :   Who chose Sir Derek Jacobi to portray Brother Cadfael? Was it Edith Pargeter herself, or someone else?

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 01 Aug 1998

Answer : I would guess that the main choice was made by the producer of the show, Stephen Smallwood. However I think it would have been unthinkable for Edith Pargeter not to have had at least some say in the final choice. I was told that Peters did meet him to decide if it was ok for him to play Cadfael in the series. I understand that she had not envisioned Cadfael as looking exactly like Jacobi, but she decided that she liked him for the part anyway.


.Question 37

From :     Linda Roy, North Bay, Ontario Canada

Posted :  
31 Jul 1998

Question :   If the services were in general three hours apart, how long in duration were they?

Answer

From : Pogo, Texas

Posted : 05 Aug 1998

Answer : Anywhere from 15 minutes (Compline) to an hour (Matins & Lauds [combined]). Usually 20 to 30 minutes.

Exactly what time they started is unclear. Were the monks using clocks or the sun? "The houre naturall or equall, is a .24. parte of the day naturall ... The artificial or temporall houre, is a twelfth parte of the daye arcke or the nighte arcke." Matins (Mattins) was scheduled for the sixth hour of the night, which is midnight (St. Benedict recommended the eighth hour of the night). Prime, Terce, Sext, and None are named for the hours of the daytime at which they were to be said: Prime at sunrise, and so forth. Vespers (evening) is late afternoon and Compline right before bed. But which hours were the monks using? Clocks which measured equal hours, being much easier to make, had been around for 600 or 700 years already. However, it makes sense for farmers to use unequal hours. In the books, it seems to me, the offices were observed by the sun, but when someone mentions a quantity of time, equal hours are meant. (The quote above is from 1561; obviously, both measures had continued through the centuries.) By the way, how long is the nighttime in Shrewsbury in late June? (Rose Rent; he died some time after Matins, and at about an hour after Prime started, had been dead six or seven hours -- which does not compute either way.)


.Question 38

From :     Richard Bouchard, Long Beach, MS USA

Posted :  
16 Aug 1998

Question :   Whatever happened to the real St. Winifred's bones?
I found an online page of Celtic saints which lists the translation of the bones to Shrewsbury. I found nothing about them at the Abbey and Shrewsbury webpages. Also I think I read where Shrewsbury was subjected to Welsh invaders in the 13th century(?). Were they lost then or when monastic lands were confiscated? Although Peters places the reliquary in the church which I believe remained with the C of E.

Answer

From : Pogo, Texas

Posted : 20 Aug 1998

Answer : The relics of St Winifred (Gwenfrewi) were discarded by Maud's g'g'g'g'g'g'g'g'g'g'grandson, Henry VIII, in 1540, when her shrine was demolished. Parts of the shrine were found in a Shrewsbury garden in 1933.  One of her finger-bones was sent to Rome at some time; it was returned to England in 1852, where it was divided in two so that Holywell and Shrewsbury could each have a piece.

Source:  Cadfael Country by Rob Talbot and Robin Whiteman, copyright 1990.   Included in The Benediction of Brother Cadfael, which is an oversize edition of A Morbid Taste for Bones and Once Corpse Too Many from Mysterious Press, 1992.

Favourite Story :   
A Morbid Taste For Bones


.Question 39

From :     Richard Bouchard, Long Beach, MS USA

Posted :  
27 Aug 1998

Question :   Were the following historical or completely fictional characters:
1. The Sheriffs: Gilbert Prestcote and Hugh Beringar and
2. The Abbots:  Fulchered, Godefrid, Heribert and Radolphus?

Favourite Story :   The Sanctuary Sparrow

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 30 Aug 1998

Answer : According to Robin Whiteman's 'Cadfael Companion'...
Gilbert Prescote : fiction
Hugh Beringar : fiction
Abbot Fulcherd : fact - died 1120. Appointed first abbot of Shrewsbury Abbey in 1087
Abbot Godefrid : fact - died 1127. Succeeded Abbot Fulcherd as abbot in 1120
Abbot Heribert : fact - died 1140. Became Abbot following death of Godefrid 1127
Abbot Radolphus : fact - died c 1148
. Succeeded Heribert sometime in 1137.

As a further note. Prior Robert succeeded Radolphus following his death in about 1148. He was also a real character and died in 1167. He was succeeded by Abbot Adam 1st (who is not mentioned in the Cadfael stories as far as I can tell).

also

From :    Seamyst

Posted : 26 Mar 2000

Answer : This is just an idea - maybe "Abbot Adam 1st" was Brother Adam, assistant to Cadfael during some of the latter books. I have no idea if it's true or not, but it's an idea.

Favourite Story :    Monk's Hood


.Question 40

From :     M. Jansen, the Netherlands

Posted :  
27 Aug 1998

Question :   Who played which actor played the character of " Sullien Blount" in " The Potter's Field"?

Favourite Story :   The Potter's Field

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 30 Aug 1998

Answer : Click here to jump to the page showing the cast list


.Question 41

From :     silvio, Miano, Itay

Posted :  
25 Aug 1998

Question :   Do you know where I can buy the cadfael videos? I've tried in a US site but they can't sell video across Europe.

Favourite Story :   The Virgin In The Ice

Answer

From :Yvonne Cox Meara, Australia

Posted : 12 Jul 1999

Answer : I have been tracking down the availability of Brother Cadfael videos in Australia. I am sending this as email so that you can insert in your Cadfael page how you will. In my 'cybertravels', using some resources from your site, several search engines and intuition, I found that the videos were produced by Central Television UK, associated with ITV, UK, and sold by Carlton Video Ltd, associated with both the former as Carlton TV. The site for Carlton is http://www.carltonvideo.co.uk They outsource the purchasing, I think, but it operates under their banner. There is no Australian distributor so we in OZ have to order from the UK to get the compatible PAL - VHS format which operates in Australia and in Europe (according to Mark Eberman of Acorn Media Publishing at meberman@acornmedia.com or http://www.acornmedia.com. So Europeans must also order from UK - this answers someone else's question, I think.


.Question 42

From :     Brad Mortensen, Havertown,PA  USA

Posted :  
29 Aug 1998

Question :   Why  does  the TV series (and particularly the wrap around introductions) place so much importance on Prior Robert, in the books he is more of a nusance than a problem.

Favourite Story :   A Morbid Taste For Bones

Answer

From :

Posted :

Answer : 


.Question 43

From :     Susan Kappel, The Netherlands

Posted :  
31 Aug 1998

Question :   Where can I find info on Anthony Green? I think he played the part of Hugh Beringar in the 4th series very well..

Favourite Story :   They're ALL good !

Answer

From :

Posted :

Answer : 


.Question 44

From :     Margit Jansen, Velp, the Netherlands

Posted :  
31 Aug 1998

Question :   Where can I buy the Cadfael videos in the Netherlands? I'm especially interested in the cadfael-story " The Potter's Field. (This episode has only just been shown in the Netherlands, but it may be out on video already. Can anybody help? - stevec)
And could anybody please give me some information on the actor who played Sulien Blount in " The Potter's Filed"? I know the actor's name is Robin (or Robert?) Laing. (It's been established that the actor's name is Robin Laing - stevec)

Favourite Story :   The Potter's Field

Answer

From :

Posted :

Answer : 


.Question 45

From :     Carleen, Birmingham

Posted :  
08 Sep 1998

Question :   I'm very curious about the reception the new Hugh Berringer has recieved, what does everyone think?  Does he live up to the book character?

Favourite Story :   
They're ALL good !

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 03 Jan 1999

Answer : See the answer to Question 47 for my thoughts on the 4th series Hugh...


.Question 46

From :     Richard Bouchard, Long Beach, MS USA

Posted :  
04 Oct 1998

Question :   Anyone know what the book "Cordially Yours, Brother Cadfael" by Anne K. Kaler is about?
Apparently published at Bowling Green in July 98 and now out of print (ISBN 087972773X).

Favourite Story :   
The Sanctuary Sparrow

Answer

From : Catherine

Posted : 05 Apr 2000

Answer : It's a slim volume of essays on Cadfael's "mysteries" and "ministries." That is, they're relatively scholarly essays which deal with Peters'/Pargeters' use of Benedictine ritual, custom and history, use of Stephen-and-Maud history, treatment of fatherhood, treatment of vision, treatment of borders, Wales, Welsh history...
They're okay (I'm using them now for a conference paper on Cadfael in romance, at the International Medieval Congress in Kalamazoo) but I wouldn't pay any bookstores $50 to find it for me. Mostly I wouldn't say it casts any great light that careful reading and research can't duplicate.


Question 47

From :     Sandy Hoskin, California

Posted :  
23 Sep 1998

Question :   The Cadfael and Hugh of the second series argued and showed little respect for each other, unlike the characters in the books.  Has that been corrected in the new series?

Favourite Story :   The Rose Rent

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 15 Oct 1998

Answer : Actually, the new Hugh is slightly better than the second one who, I agree, seemed very forceful and overriding. However, of the (sadly) only episode of the 4th series that the TV in the UK have shown so far ('The Holy Thief') I'd say that the new Hugh is slightly less sure of himself.

I mean that in one scene (this doesn't give anything away, by the way!) he is opting for trial by water as a way of seeing whether somebody is innocent - despite the protests of Cadfael.

Now, I don't know whether you agree with me, but the book Hugh and even the (first) TV Hugh would not, I think, have even looked at such a system. I know it is probably historically accurate, but I personally don't think that the book Hugh would have worked that way.

Hopefully, in the other two stories in the fourth series, he'll come more 'up to date' :-)

update 03 Jan 1999

I've now seen 'The Potters Field' and 'The Pilgrim of Hate' and I'm afraid to say that I think the Hugh Character falls far below that of the book stories. He is much too .... butch (for want of a better word) than the book Hugh who I would class as more thoughtful, wily even. The Tv Hugh is too prone to grabbing people by the scruff of the neck and threatening people about what will happen when he "get's them on their own". You could argue that this is more accurate to the times. We are talking 12 century here folks. But you could also argue that the stories and characters should be faithful to the writing of Elis Peters. Take your pick !


.Question 48

From :     Sally Elmes, Springwood NSW Australia

Posted :  
06 Nov 1998

Question :   Can you please tell me about the tonsure? Why do the monks have them? When do they aquire them?

Favourite Story :   
One Corpse Too Many

Answer

From : Jose Escobar, Charleston, SC

Posted : 08 Jan 1999

Answer : Tonsure was a former practice in some Christian churches of cutting some of the hair from the scalps of clerics. 
In the West the tonsure consisted of a circular patch on the crown of the head from which the hair was kept cut; some tonsures kept the entire head shaved above the ears, and some reatined a broad band of hair around the head. 
In the 6th and 7th centuries one of the outstanding questions between the Celtic use and the Roman use was the tonsure, which the Celts made by cutting the hair off the front part of the head from ear to ear. 
The Roman Catholic Church abolished the practice of tonsure in 1972. 
Tonsure was received by men renouncing temporal goods and who were joining a monastic order or the secular clergy.

Favourite Story :   A Morbid Taste For Bones


.Question 49

From :     jeff hathaway, plymouth twp., PA

Posted :  
19 Nov 1998

Question :   do you know if derek jacobi intends to do all 21 Peters' Cadfael? Actor jeremy brett had wanted to do all of sherlock holmes, but he died before completion...

Favourite Story :   
A Morbid Taste For Bones

Answer

From : Me

Posted : 03 Jan 1999

Answer : Although I do not know for certain, I would assume that all the stories will be done as time goes on. Especially if they continue to sell well overseas, which certainly seems to be the case at the moment.

also

From :    Seamyst

Posted : 26 Mar 2000

Answer : Actually, I don't think that they're going to do any more Cadfael TV shows. I read an interview with Derek Jacobi, done after the completion of the fourth series, and one of the questions goes something like, "What are you going to miss most about portraying Cadfael", and he starts off with "Well, I shan't miss the hairdo!". They might get someone else to portray Cadfael, but it just wouldn't be the same. Wouldn't be Cadfael, in my opinion. Sorry if I disappoint, and I wish they would do more, as I love them!

Favourite Story :    Monk's Hood


.Question 50

From :     susan, Conroe, TX

Posted :  
02 Dec 1998

Question :   During a visit to England last year, I was able to visit Shrewsbury.  However, it was in another piece of the visit - to Wells Cathedral - that I was surprised to find a Brother Cadfael link.  Abbot Radulphus is buried there.  His tomb is labeled both in Latin (the original inscription) and an English translation stating that he was "Bishop of Bath and Wells".  This seems to take him beyond just the abbot of a monastery.  Does anyone know anything more about the historical Radulphus and why he was buried at Wells rather than Shrewsbury?

Favourite Story :   
Brother Cadfael's Penance

Answer

From : Biggles286 from Sheffield, England.

Posted : 19 Sep 1999

Answer : I think Bishop Radulphus and Abbot Radulfus were different people. Abbot Radulfus did exist, but he died in c.1148 and Prior Robert Pennant took over as Abbot. If Radulfus had moved on to Bath and Wells, Robert couldn't have taken over on his death.
I would be inclined to believe that Radulphus was probably quite a common Norman name and that the Radulphus that you found was just a coincidence.
Sorry if I disappoint.


Written by SteveC